Program Members

Clinical Program Leader

Disease Aligned Research Team Leader

Hepatology

Medical Oncology

  • Stacey Stein

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Medical Oncology)

    I take care of patients with advanced liver cancer and offer chemotherapy. I help educate my patients and their families about their cancer and liver disease. Treatment plans often include a pill form of targeted therapy. There are also immune therapy clinical trials available for patients. I work closely with patients to manage their cancer and liver disease related symptoms.

Surgery

  • Charles Cha

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Oncology and Gastrointestinal)

    Charles H. Cha, MD, FACS earned his medical degree from Northwestern University Medical School and is a Board Certified Surgeon. He completed a surgical oncology fellowship at Memorial Sloan Kettering in New York. He is dedicated to advancing surgical techniques for removing tumors and advancing medical knowledge about tumor growth. In his practice, he continually integrates the latest in minimally invasive techniques and surgical technology to provide better outcomes for his patients. Dr. Cha is one of the few surgeons in the region with considerable experience in laparoscopic and robotic surgery for liver and stomach tumors.

    He specializes in benign and malignant diseases of the liver, esophagus, stomach, colon, and pancreas. He currently serves as the Director of the Minimally Invasive Hepatopancreatobiliary Program with an specific interest in robotic and laparoscopic surgery for the liver, pancreas and stomach.

    Dr. Cha has established an active research laboratory studying the effects of angiogenesis on colorectal and liver malignancy using gene-silencing techniques to silence angiogenic factors leading to decreased tumor growth. His clinical research includes the determination of the diagnostic and therapeutic utility of angiogenic inhibitors for treatment of colorectal and liver cancers. In addition, he is involved in clinical outcomes research in surgery for liver, gastric, esophageal, and colorectal malignancy using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database as well as the Connecticut Tumor Registry.

    He has received numerous awards and recognitions for his research and teaching, including the American College of Surgeons Faculty Research Award and the Ohse Surgical Research Award.

  • Sajid A Khan

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Oncology)

    Sajid A. Khan, MD earned his medical degree from the State University of New York Health Science Center at Syracuse and is Board Certified in both Complex General Surgical Oncology and General Surgery. He completed general surgery training at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, OR and Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore in the Bronx, NY. He also completed a research fellowship in surgical oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, NY and a clinical and research fellowship in surgical oncology at The University of Chicago Medical Center in Chicago, IL.

    As an Associate Professor of Surgery (Oncology), Dr. Khan is dedicated to improving the lives of patients with cancer through his clinical practice and research endeavors. His clinical practice specializes in the surgical management of patients with benign and malignant tumors of the liver, pancreas, bile ducts, gallbladder, stomach, and colon. Additionally he treats individuals diagnosed with cutaneous malignancies and soft tissue sarcomas of the retroperitoneum and extremities. His commitment to the care of his patients incorporates a multidisciplinary team approach in addition to state of the art minimally invasive surgical techniques.

    In addition to his clinical practice, Dr. Khan is also involved in clinical translational research studying cancer metastases and differences in tumor biology based on ethnicity/race and sex.  Dr. Khan is an NIH-funded, surgeon-scientist who seeks to use modern molecular biology to improve our understanding and treatment of patients with gastrointestinal cancers. Using molecular and clinical markers, he identifies patients with a limited number of metastases (oligometastasis) who will benefit from curative surgical resections.  In addition, his lab studies the relationship with metabolite and protein expression on colon cancer patient outcomes based on race/ethnicity and sex. He also performs clinical outcomes research in all types of gastrointestinal cancers. Dr. Khan has been recognized for excellence in both clinical care and research in oncology.

  • Ronald Salem

    Lampman Professor of Surgery (Oncology); Section Chief, Surgical Oncology

    Ronald R. Salem, MD earned his medical degree from University of Rhodesia and is a Board Certified Surgeon. Passionate about improving the lives of patients with cancer, he is committed to advancing medical and surgical treatment and integrating the latest techniques and minimally invasive surgery in his clinical practice. He is one of the few surgeons in Connecticut with a high volume practice performing the Whipple procedure.

    Dr. Salem specializes in malignant and pre-malignant diseases of the pancreas, liver and biliary system, the gall bladder, stomach, colon and rectum, lymphoma, neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract as well as liver tumors in pregnant women.

    His research includes a special focus on optimizing clinical outcomes in patients undergoing pancreatic surgery, combined modality therapy for esophageal cancer and the management of benign and malignant liver tumors.

    He has received many honors and recognitions, including The Best Doctors, N.Y. Metro Area annually for over ten years; Best Doctors in Connecticut and Top Minimally Invasive Surgeons, NY Metro Area.

    He was recently awarded the prestigious David and Cindy Lefell Award for clinical excellence, the Yale New Haven Hospital Heroes Award, the Smilow Cancer Center Clinical Award the Alvin Feinstein Teaching Award and has received the Chief Resident in Surgery Teaching Award on seven separate occasions.

Transplant

  • Sukru Emre

    Professor of Surgery (Transplant) and of Pediatrics

    Dr. Emre received his medical degree from the University of Istanbul where he also completed a residency in general surgery. His clinical post-doctoral training includes completion of a hepatobiliary surgery fellowship at the University of Istanbul and a transplant fellowship at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York. He also completed two transplantation research fellowships, one at SUNY Health Science Center at Brooklyn and another at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York. He holds a foreign board certification in general surgery and is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons.

    Dr. Emre is an expert in adult and pediatric liver transplantations. He has performed more than 2,000 liver transplants, of which the youngest patient was 16 days old and the oldest was 75 years old. His special interests are performing split-liver transplants and living donor transplants which involves transplanting a portion of a donor's healthy liver into a recipient. He is also expert in hepato-biliary surgery including resection for liver cancer, portal hypertension surgery, repair of complex bile duct injuries and Kasai procedure for biliary atresia. Dr. Emre's research interests include hepatocyte transplantation for chldren born with urea cycle defects, acute liver failure, biliary atresia and rare cholestatic diseases in children, and transplanting adult patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, sclorosing cholangitis, autoimmune hepatitis, hepatitis B, C and liver cancer.

  • David Mulligan

    Professor of Surgery (Transplant); Section Chief, Transplantation Surgery and Immunology

    As a multi-organ transplant surgeon trained at Baylor University with a heavy experience in liver transplantation, I have enjoyed an exciting and rewarding career. I returned to CWRU after fellowship in order to take my experiences to an area of need. Soon thereafter, I was recruited by the Mayo Clinic to build a multi-organ transplant program in Arizona. Following the pioneering spirit, our small team was able to assemble a wonderful and successful liver, kidney and pancreas transplant program to achieve the highest quality in the country after 14 years. I also had the honor to help establish a successful heart and pediatric liver program at Mayo Clinic and Phoenix Children’s Hospital. We were able to establish a highly successful living donor liver transplant program with the highest long term patient and graft survival as well as multiple other unique and novel accomplishments and many academic contributions throughout my 15-year history there.

    I then accepted the challenge to move my family across the country to Connecticut where I was recruited to join Yale University and a stimulating faculty to establish a patient-centered, collaborative team environment accompanied by outstanding academic clinical and basic science research. Over the past 3 years, our team is emerging in amazing ways to achieve new heights in outstanding quality and cutting-edge science. We are testing novel strategies in immunosuppression, improved biomechanical organ preservation methods to reduce ischemia/reperfusion injury and promote regeneration as well as work in the field of 3D bioprinting to collaborate in finding ways to grow new organs from stem cell precursors. We are also leading the field by utilizing Telemedicine technologies to better communicate with patients and providers to enhance care, practice efficiency, and most importantly, patient experience.

    Throughout my career in transplantation, I have remained active in leadership responsibilities for multiple national and international organizations and led major efforts including creating means to reduce the disparity of access to life-saving livers in this country across our current geographic areas. I have generated recognition in the area of living donor liver transplantation as I have performed more than 200 cases.

    We are also working on ways to develop a healthier, more integrated team and build self-care and resilience in our practice and for our patients across the entire Yale Health System. I feel privileged to work with an amazing team of surgeons, hepatologists, nephrologists, immunologists, and nurses to continue my work in this rewarding field and pledge to continue my efforts to lead our community to find better ways to provide the best possible patient care in the safest environments.

Interventional Radiology

  • Raj Ayyagari

    Assistant Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging; Radiology Director for Male Interventional Health

    I am a board-certified Interventional Radiologist, which means I perform image-guided minimally invasive surgical procedures. These procedures are done by passing a specialized needle or catheter into a quarter-inch hole in the skin, and from there I use radiographic, ultrasound, or CT-scan guidance to steer my instruments through blood vessels or soft tissues into the organ that I wish to treat. Almost every procedure can be done with IV sedation medication alone, so the patient does not need general anesthesia. Most patients usually can return home the same day with only a small bandage on, and they can often can go back to their normal activities after only a day or two of recovery at home.

    As part of the Yale Liver Cancer Program, I perform many minimally invasive procedures to treat liver tumors. These procedures include chemoembolization (injecting microscopic beads coated with a chemotherapy drug into the tumor), radioembolization (injecting microscopic beads carrying a radioactive dose into the tumor), and ablation (passing a small needle through the skin, into the tumor, and burning or freezing it to death). I also perform biopsies, place venous access catheters, and perform many other procedures related to the evaluation and treatment of liver cancer.

    I perform procedures in every part of the body, but I also specialize in some remarkable minimally invasive procedures that are available to treat problems that patients have in their urinary and reproductive organ systems, problems that can severely impact quality of life or even life expectancy. These procedures can treat such problems successfully and safely, while allowing patients to avoid more invasive surgery.

    Prostatic artery embolization (PAE) is a remarkable procedure that has been around now for about 6 years. It is a safe and highly effective yet minimally invasive outpatient procedure that shrinks the prostate dramatically. This helps older men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) regain the ability to urinate normally again, without having to go through invasive surgeries like a TURP (Trans-Urethral Resection of Prostate) or prostatectomy. This is truly a revolutionary procedure that has helped many men regain control of their lives, after suffering from what can become a severe medical condition that controls one's life.

    For both younger and older male patients with large dilated veins in their scrotum, and common problem known as a varicocele, I also perform a safe and highly effective and minimally invasive outpatient procedure that closes these veins and shrinks them down. This procedure is a way to treat the pain, cosmetic problems, or even concerns for fertility (ability to have children) that can plague patients with this condition.

  • Kevin Kim

    Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging; Professor of Medicine (Medical Oncology); Section Chief, Interventional Radiology

    Dr. Kim is Professor of Radiology and Medicine (Medical Oncology), Vice Chair of Clinical Research and Chief of Interventional Radiology at Yale School of Medicine. He also leads the Smilow Interventional Oncology program. Dr. Kim was trained at the MD Anderson Cancer Center and the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He is an authority in image-guided interventional oncology and advanced cancers. He is an expert in minimally invasive treatments and takes care of patients with advanced cancers with the most advanced anti-cancer treatments such as targeted drug delivery and targeted radiation delivery therapies to liver cancers (TACE, Y90 radioembolization), image-guided precision microwave ablation, radiofrequency ablation and immuno-cryotherapy. Dr. Kim’s research focus is targeted therapy with immune modulation in advanced cancers. Dr. Kim is a member of Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, New Haven, CT.

  • David C. Madoff

    Vice Chair for Clinical Research, Radiology & Biomedical Imaging

    Dr. David C. Madoff is Professor of Radiology and Vice Chair for Clinical Research at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Madoff earned his B.A. from Emory University and his M.D. from the University of Pittsburgh. He completed both his internship in Internal Medicine and residency in Radiology at SUNY at Stony Brook and his fellowship training in Vascular and Interventional Radiology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Madoff achieved Board Certification in Diagnostic Radiology from the American Board of Radiology in 2000 and attained his Certificate of Added Qualifications in Vascular and Interventional Radiology in 2002. He was a faculty member in the Section of Interventional Radiology at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas for a decade before joining New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center in 2011. While at Weill Cornell, Dr. Madoff served as Division Chief of Interventional Radiology from 2011 to 2015 and Vice Chair for Academic Affairs from 2015 to 2019. He moved to Yale in July, 2019.

    Dr. Madoff has a strong background in clinical care and has treated many patients with complex oncological problems. His clinical interests are wide-ranging, and have included visceral vascular, hepatobiliary and genitourinary interventions, various embolotherapy and percutaneous biopsy techniques and many specialized therapies within the realm of Interventional Oncology. In particular, Dr. Madoff is world-renowned for his work on preoperative portal vein embolization, a technique used to improve the safety of major hepatic resection. This technique is based on the liver's ability to regenerate and has been used in patients with primary and metastatic hepatobiliary cancer to increase the size of the anticipated liver remnant before surgery. Without this procedure, many patients with potentially resectable disease would not be eligible for curative resection.

    Dr. Madoff is a leader in academic Interventional Radiology and has been an invited speaker at numerous national and international meetings. He authored or co-authored over 120 peer-reviewed scientific articles, has written more than 30 book chapters and served as co-editor of four textbooks including Venous Embolization of the Liver: Radiologic and Surgical Practice (2011), Clinical Interventional Oncology (2014) and Interventional Radiology: Fundamentals of Clinical Practice (2019). Dr. Madoff served as Deputy Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology from 2007 to 2010 and Deputy Editor for Radiology from 2012 to 2017. Dr. Madoff currently serves as founding co-Editor-in-Chief for Digestive Disease Interventions and on the editorial boards of additional publications that include Techniques in Vascular and Interventional RadiologySeminars in Interventional Radiology, European Radiology Experimental, Cancer Biology & Medicine, Chinese Clinical Oncology and Current Oncology Reports. Dr. Madoff is active in many of the major radiological societies including the Radiological Society of North America, the American Roentgen Ray Society, the Society of Interventional Radiology and the Association of University Radiologists and serves on the Board of Trustees of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). Based on his important contributions to the field, Dr. Madoff was elected Fellow of the Society of Interventional Radiology in 2007, the American College of Radiology in 2015 and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology Society of Europe in 2018.

  • Jeffrey Pollak

    Robert I. White, Jr. Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging; Director, Yale Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia Program; Director, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Fellowship Program

    Dr. Pollak went to medical school at the Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons and subsequently did his Diagnostic Radiology residency at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. His fellowship in Vascular & Interventional Radiology was at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He then joined the Yale University School of Medicine Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging in the section of V&IR and served as the section chief and director of the fellowship program in this sub-specialty for over two decades. While active in all aspects of vascular & interventional radiology, his current major interests are embolotherapy (embolization), including for acquired and congenital vascular abnormalities and malformations (other than in the brain), fibroids, and malignancies, as well as other minimally invasive treatments for tumors, including local ablation. In addition, he is an expert in vascular procedures in the liver, such as intrahepatic portosystemic shunts and venous procedures, such as inferior vena cava filters.

    Dr. Pollak is the current director of the multidisciplinary Yale Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia Program, which was started as the first of its kind in the world in the early 1990s. As such, he has extensive experience in the evaluation and management of patients with this genetic disorder, with particular expertise in embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations, which frequently occur in this population. Dr. Pollak is also the co-director of the Yale Pulmonary Embolism Response Team, a multidisciplinary group of physicians interested in the advancement of the management of patients with this condition, especially those with more severe manifestations.

Diagnostic Radiology

  • Julius Chapiro

    Associate Research Scientist in Radiology and Biomedical Imaging; Resident in Radiology and Biomedical Imaging

    Dr. Chapiro joined the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging as a research scientist and interventional radiology resident from Berlin, Germany. After graduating from the University of Leipzig and upon completion of his research thesis at the Justus-Liebig University in Giessen with summa cum laude, he served as a postdoctoral research fellow in interventional oncology at The Johns Hopkins Hospital and then as radiology resident at the Department of Radiology, Charité University Hospital in Berlin.

    Dr. Chapiro’s research focuses on developing new quantitative imaging biomarkers for the diagnosis, characterization, and therapeutic management of liver cancer. His translational research portfolio includes the development of novel embolic agents as well as the application of artificial intelligence solutions for the management of liver cancer. His basic research interest mainly focuses on developing new tools to characterize the tumor microenvironment and the immune system in the setting of loco-regional, image-guided therapies of liver cancer.

    Creating innovative and clinically applicable imaging solutions for liver cancer with advanced molecular imaging, image post-processing and machine learning approaches and translating them to clinical practice has been his central mission for the past five years. He authored and co-authored >60 original research articles, numerous reviews and book chapters and gave more than 50 talks and invited lectures within the last four years. His research has also resulted in several filed patent applications, 510(k)-approved medical products and significant grant support from federal, foundational and industry sources. He is an active research mentor to more than 30 undergraduate, medical and graduate students as well as peers both at Yale and other national and international institutions. Being an active contributor, journal-, abstract- and grant reviewer in several professional societies (RSNA, SIR and SIO), he is also committed to education and the mission of disseminating research data and scientific knowledge. Dr. Chapiro is a member of the ACR Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System (LI-RADS) Steering Committee, he additionally serves on the SIO Research Committee and is Co-Track Chair of the Interventional Oncology meeting program at the annual RSNA meeting since 2017. He is the co-initiator of the "Rising Star" Student Exchange Program in collaboration with the Charité University Hospital in Berlin and co-manages the Yale Radiology Research laboratory.

  • Gary Israel

    Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging; Chief, Body Imaging Section; Chief, Body Computed Tomography (CT)

    Gary Israel, MD, Professor and Chief of Computed Tomography, comes to Yale from NYU Medical Center. Dr. Israel earned his medical degree at New York Medical College, and completed a residency and fellowship in diagnostic radiology at Montefore Medical Center and New York University Medical Center, respectively.

    Dr. Israel’s expertise is abdominal imaging with a particular focus on genitourinary imaging (GU), using both CT and MRI. He has particular interest in the CT and MR evaluation of renal masses and CT and MR urography, which can replace the IV pyelogram (IVP). He also has expertise in GI radiology including CT colonography (also known as a ‘virtual’ colonoscopy) as well as 3D post-processing techniques.

  • Jeffrey Weinreb

    Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging; Director, MRI Services; Chief, MRI Service

    After graduating Phi Beta Kappa from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dr. Weinreb received his medical degree from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He has held faculty positions at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Columbia College for Physicians and Surgeons, and New York University School of Medicine, where he was Director of MRI for 15 years and led a group that pioneered the development of Body MRI, Breast MRI, and MRA. Yale has been his home since 2002.
    Dr. Weinreb is currently Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging at the Yale School of Medicine and Chief of MRI at Yale-New Haven Hospital. He is a leading authority on MRI contrast agents, MRI safety, and the use of MRI for the abdomen (focusing on the liver), and pelvis (focusing on the prostate). A noted educator and lecturer, he has presented more than 900 invited lectures and has been a frequent Visiting Professor throughout the world. Dr. Weinreb has authored/co-authored more than 200 published manuscripts and 3 textbooks, and he has been on the editorial boards of numerous medical journals. As Chairman of the American College of Radiology Commission on Quality and Safety, Dr. Weinreb spearheaded efforts to improve the quality of medical imaging in the USA. Recently, he led an international effort to develop PI-RADS v2 (Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System Version 2) to standardize the acquisition, interpretation, and reporting of prostate MRI, and the manuscript was recognized as the Best Clinical Research Paper published in European Urology for 2016. He has served as President of the SCBT/MR, President of the New York Roentgen Society, and Vice President of the ACR, and he currently chairs ACR RADS Steering Committee. He is the recipient of the 2017 ACR Gold Medal Award.

Interventional Oncology

  • Raj Ayyagari

    Assistant Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging; Radiology Director for Male Interventional Health

    I am a board-certified Interventional Radiologist, which means I perform image-guided minimally invasive surgical procedures. These procedures are done by passing a specialized needle or catheter into a quarter-inch hole in the skin, and from there I use radiographic, ultrasound, or CT-scan guidance to steer my instruments through blood vessels or soft tissues into the organ that I wish to treat. Almost every procedure can be done with IV sedation medication alone, so the patient does not need general anesthesia. Most patients usually can return home the same day with only a small bandage on, and they can often can go back to their normal activities after only a day or two of recovery at home.

    As part of the Yale Liver Cancer Program, I perform many minimally invasive procedures to treat liver tumors. These procedures include chemoembolization (injecting microscopic beads coated with a chemotherapy drug into the tumor), radioembolization (injecting microscopic beads carrying a radioactive dose into the tumor), and ablation (passing a small needle through the skin, into the tumor, and burning or freezing it to death). I also perform biopsies, place venous access catheters, and perform many other procedures related to the evaluation and treatment of liver cancer.

    I perform procedures in every part of the body, but I also specialize in some remarkable minimally invasive procedures that are available to treat problems that patients have in their urinary and reproductive organ systems, problems that can severely impact quality of life or even life expectancy. These procedures can treat such problems successfully and safely, while allowing patients to avoid more invasive surgery.

    Prostatic artery embolization (PAE) is a remarkable procedure that has been around now for about 6 years. It is a safe and highly effective yet minimally invasive outpatient procedure that shrinks the prostate dramatically. This helps older men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) regain the ability to urinate normally again, without having to go through invasive surgeries like a TURP (Trans-Urethral Resection of Prostate) or prostatectomy. This is truly a revolutionary procedure that has helped many men regain control of their lives, after suffering from what can become a severe medical condition that controls one's life.

    For both younger and older male patients with large dilated veins in their scrotum, and common problem known as a varicocele, I also perform a safe and highly effective and minimally invasive outpatient procedure that closes these veins and shrinks them down. This procedure is a way to treat the pain, cosmetic problems, or even concerns for fertility (ability to have children) that can plague patients with this condition.

  • Kevin Kim

    Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging; Professor of Medicine (Medical Oncology); Section Chief, Interventional Radiology

    Dr. Kim is Professor of Radiology and Medicine (Medical Oncology), Vice Chair of Clinical Research and Chief of Interventional Radiology at Yale School of Medicine. He also leads the Smilow Interventional Oncology program. Dr. Kim was trained at the MD Anderson Cancer Center and the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He is an authority in image-guided interventional oncology and advanced cancers. He is an expert in minimally invasive treatments and takes care of patients with advanced cancers with the most advanced anti-cancer treatments such as targeted drug delivery and targeted radiation delivery therapies to liver cancers (TACE, Y90 radioembolization), image-guided precision microwave ablation, radiofrequency ablation and immuno-cryotherapy. Dr. Kim’s research focus is targeted therapy with immune modulation in advanced cancers. Dr. Kim is a member of Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, New Haven, CT.

  • David C. Madoff

    Vice Chair for Clinical Research, Radiology & Biomedical Imaging

    Dr. David C. Madoff is Professor of Radiology and Vice Chair for Clinical Research at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Madoff earned his B.A. from Emory University and his M.D. from the University of Pittsburgh. He completed both his internship in Internal Medicine and residency in Radiology at SUNY at Stony Brook and his fellowship training in Vascular and Interventional Radiology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Madoff achieved Board Certification in Diagnostic Radiology from the American Board of Radiology in 2000 and attained his Certificate of Added Qualifications in Vascular and Interventional Radiology in 2002. He was a faculty member in the Section of Interventional Radiology at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas for a decade before joining New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center in 2011. While at Weill Cornell, Dr. Madoff served as Division Chief of Interventional Radiology from 2011 to 2015 and Vice Chair for Academic Affairs from 2015 to 2019. He moved to Yale in July, 2019.

    Dr. Madoff has a strong background in clinical care and has treated many patients with complex oncological problems. His clinical interests are wide-ranging, and have included visceral vascular, hepatobiliary and genitourinary interventions, various embolotherapy and percutaneous biopsy techniques and many specialized therapies within the realm of Interventional Oncology. In particular, Dr. Madoff is world-renowned for his work on preoperative portal vein embolization, a technique used to improve the safety of major hepatic resection. This technique is based on the liver's ability to regenerate and has been used in patients with primary and metastatic hepatobiliary cancer to increase the size of the anticipated liver remnant before surgery. Without this procedure, many patients with potentially resectable disease would not be eligible for curative resection.

    Dr. Madoff is a leader in academic Interventional Radiology and has been an invited speaker at numerous national and international meetings. He authored or co-authored over 120 peer-reviewed scientific articles, has written more than 30 book chapters and served as co-editor of four textbooks including Venous Embolization of the Liver: Radiologic and Surgical Practice (2011), Clinical Interventional Oncology (2014) and Interventional Radiology: Fundamentals of Clinical Practice (2019). Dr. Madoff served as Deputy Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology from 2007 to 2010 and Deputy Editor for Radiology from 2012 to 2017. Dr. Madoff currently serves as founding co-Editor-in-Chief for Digestive Disease Interventions and on the editorial boards of additional publications that include Techniques in Vascular and Interventional RadiologySeminars in Interventional Radiology, European Radiology Experimental, Cancer Biology & Medicine, Chinese Clinical Oncology and Current Oncology Reports. Dr. Madoff is active in many of the major radiological societies including the Radiological Society of North America, the American Roentgen Ray Society, the Society of Interventional Radiology and the Association of University Radiologists and serves on the Board of Trustees of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). Based on his important contributions to the field, Dr. Madoff was elected Fellow of the Society of Interventional Radiology in 2007, the American College of Radiology in 2015 and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology Society of Europe in 2018.

  • Jeffrey Pollak

    Robert I. White, Jr. Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging; Director, Yale Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia Program; Director, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Fellowship Program

    Dr. Pollak went to medical school at the Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons and subsequently did his Diagnostic Radiology residency at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. His fellowship in Vascular & Interventional Radiology was at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He then joined the Yale University School of Medicine Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging in the section of V&IR and served as the section chief and director of the fellowship program in this sub-specialty for over two decades. While active in all aspects of vascular & interventional radiology, his current major interests are embolotherapy (embolization), including for acquired and congenital vascular abnormalities and malformations (other than in the brain), fibroids, and malignancies, as well as other minimally invasive treatments for tumors, including local ablation. In addition, he is an expert in vascular procedures in the liver, such as intrahepatic portosystemic shunts and venous procedures, such as inferior vena cava filters.

    Dr. Pollak is the current director of the multidisciplinary Yale Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia Program, which was started as the first of its kind in the world in the early 1990s. As such, he has extensive experience in the evaluation and management of patients with this genetic disorder, with particular expertise in embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations, which frequently occur in this population. Dr. Pollak is also the co-director of the Yale Pulmonary Embolism Response Team, a multidisciplinary group of physicians interested in the advancement of the management of patients with this condition, especially those with more severe manifestations.

Radiation Oncology

  • Sanjay Aneja

    Assistant Professor of Therapeutic Radiology

    Sanjay Aneja, MD is an Assistant Professor within the Department of Therapeutic Radiology at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Aneja is a physician scientist whose research group is focused on the application of machine learning techniques on clinical oncology. He received his medical degree from Yale School of Medicine and served as class president. During medical school he completed a research fellowship at the Department of Health and Human Services in large scale data analysis. He later completed his medicine internship at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center followed by his residency in radiation oncology at Yale-New Haven Hospital. During his residency he completed his post-doc in machine learning at the Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE) receiving research grant from IBM Computing. He is currently a recipient of an NIH Career Development award, an NSF research grant, and an American Cancer Society research award.

    The Aneja Labs on-going efforts include: 

    1) Deep Learning to Derive Imaging Based Biomarkers of Cancer Outcomes: We have previously shown the ability for deep learning to derive imaging-based biomarkers for lung cancer and are currently applying our deep learning platform to brain metastases. We have developed a national consortium of 7 institutions whom have contributed data to our effort. This project is funded by the NIH, AHRQ, Radiation Society of North America (RSNA), and the American Cancer Society.

    2) AI-Driven Collection of Patient Reported Outcomes: Our group is developing deep learning algorithms which use patient audio diaries to predict validated patient reported outcome metrics. Through a collaboration with Amazon, we hope to integrate our algorithm into virtual assistants and pilot them in a clinical setting. 

    3) Machine Learning Methods for Clinical Trial Classification: Our group, through a collaboration with SWOG and an industry partner, is studying the ability of machine learning to classify cancer clinical trials and match clinicians to relevant randomized clinical trials. This project is currently funded by the NSF and SWOG Hope Grant. 

Pathology

  • Dhanpat Jain

    Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Digestive Diseases); Director, Program in Gastrointestinal and Liver Pathology; Director, Fellowship in Gastrointestinal and Liver Pathology

    Dr. Dhanpat Jain is a Professor of Pathology and Internal Medicine (section of Digestive Diseases). He is also the director of the program in gastrointestinal pathology at Yale. Dr. Jain graduated from Mysore Medical College, Mysore, India and received his M.B.B.S degree in 1986. He subsequently received his M.D. Pathology degree from Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India in 1991. He moved to the U.S. in 1995 and completed his Anatomic Pathology residency and Fellowship in Gastrointestinal Pathology at Yale University School of Medicine, and subsequently continued as a faculty there.

    Dr. Jain is a nationally and internationally recognized gastrointestinal pathologist known for his diagnostic skills, research and teaching. He has more than 100 publications, many book chapters, books and reviews, all of which are largely in the field of gastrointestinal and liver pathology. He has delivered many lectures and participated in many courses at the national and international level. He is on the editorial board of several high impact journals in the field of gastrointestinal and liver disorders. His area of expertise is motility disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, for which he gets cases in consultation from across the globe. Dr. Jain is an accomplished teacher and has received many awards. He has continuously been nominated for “Best Doctors in America” for many years.

  • Xuchen Zhang

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Xuchen Zhang, MD, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Pathology who is board-certified in both anatomic and clinical pathology. He has clinical interests and expertise in liver/gastrointestinal pathology, liver neoplasms, liver transplant pathology, and neoplastic and non-neoplastic pulmonary pathology. His research interests are acute and chronic oxidant-induced lung injury, liver neoplasms, alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver diseases, colorectal cancer and underlying molecular mechanisms.

Patient Care